HOW TO GET HERE

Arrowdale is near Gairloch on one of the most beautiful stretches of coastline in the Scottish Highlands.

 

It is quite remote, and effectively inaccessible via public transport.  There are only occasional buses from Inverness to Gairloch.  The nearest train station is half an hour’s drive away, in Achnasheen.

 

Inverness airport is a little less than two hours away by car. 

 

If you choose to drive from the south it can take around 5 hours from Edinburgh depending on the time of year.  The A9 from Perth to Inverness is a busy road and is largely single carriageway with only some sections of dual carriage.  It is by no means a dangerous road, but it requires a little caution.  You will see some excellent views and you will also pass the famous roadside stop, The House of Bruar.  It is well worth a visit, if a little pricey.

From Inverness the road is quite easy and takes around 1 ½ to 1 ¾ hours.  The A9 gives way to the A835 (signposted for Ullapool) until Garve where you turn left on the A832.  This is a stunning road, wonderful to drive on, and with some glorious scenery.  Don’t be surprised if you need to stop on numerous occasions to take a photo!  The final section, the B8056 (on the left over a narrow stone bridge and signposted Shieldaig) brings you to the sea and some wonderful coastal views along a winding single track road. The turning to Arrowdale is about half a mile after the Shieldaig Lodge Hotel.  It is on the right, immediately after a red post box at the top of a hill.  It is a shared private drive and there is no sign post for Arrowdale (or any of the other houses) visible from the public road. Go through the button-operated electric gate and down the hill between two wooden houses.  Arrowdale is about 100 yards down the drive, signposted to the left where the road forks. 

 

 

 

Note about single track roads 

If you drive in the Highlands you will come across single track roads.  These are only wide enough for one vehicle and they have designated passing places. If you see a vehicle coming towards you (or the driver behind wants to overtake) pull into a passing place on your left, or wait opposite a passing place on your right. Give way to vehicles coming uphill whenever you can. They are a charming way to explore some more beautiful and isolated places, and it is likely you may come upon sheep or cattle wandering freely, enjoying historic common grazing rights.